Growing

Kitchen counter growing area

This corner of the counter is hard to get to and gets lots of light, so it’s been accumulating a lot of plants.  The bush beans have started producing flowers and a few small beans, and the pole beans have grown up along the twine K. put up the side of the cabinets.  I aim to plant those pineapple tops today.  And in front is a trick we learned from H. at Ol’ Wondermoth: planting the bottoms of scallions so you eventually have a constantly growing supply.

Future beans

Despite yesterday’s spitting cold/wet weather, N. was preparing ground for gardening.  We’ll be growing hops on that fence!  And beans this year, since hops won’t take up the whole thing.  Clearly the fence will need to be braced first, but this summer will mark the beginning of our attempt to obscure the view of those glazing trucks.

There used to be a patch of trees between our cluster of buildings and the active railroad tracks.  We called it the Hobo Woods because there was a small tarp-and-tires camp there, usually unoccupied.  In February, the Hobo Woods got bulldozed and now there’s a big stretch of mud and gravel where they used to be.  K. and I went back there last night with some seeds – wildflowers, clover, and daisies – and sowed them.  Who knows whether something will eventually be built there or whether they’ll mow whatever grows.  This town has a bad mowing habit.

Peppers and tomatoes

John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats says to plant tomatoes next to peppers, always, (some of that companion planting mumbo jumbo all the kids are talking about?) and I was relieved to see that we were already following that advice.  Here are our young peppers and tomatoes, separated only by a row of convulvulus.  The peppers definitely lived up to their promise of “slow and erratic germination.”  These will be going in the ground soon.

And N. is still hellbent on turning his room into an indoor garden paradise focused on salad greens with an occasional detour into beans and Swiss chard.

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